Health Information Upgrade

Posted on February 27th, 2009 — in Health Care :: Technology

The federal stimulus package includes roughly $36 billion in outlays over six years for health information technology. The California HealthCare Foundation has a number of recommendations for how California can compete for and use the state’s fair share.


Economic Futures

Posted on October 22nd, 2008 — in Economy and Business :: Employment :: Resources and Environment :: Technology

The Innovation Driven Economic Development Model [Bay Area Council Economic Institute]

Energy Efficiency, Innovation, and Job Creation in California [Center for Energy, Resources, and Economic Sustainability; Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics; UC Berkeley]

Building San Francisco’s Cleantech Economy: Analysis and Strategy Options [San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association]

Does the economy look greener on the other side of innovation? Three reports examine the dynamics of policy and resources. The Innovation Driven Economic Development Model is based on the new realities of globalization and the changing nature of the innovation process. Energy Efficiency, Innovation, and Job Creation in California looks at the long term impact of energy efficiency on economic growth. And the San Francisco Urban Planning and Research Association zooms in on local economic greening in Building San Francisco’s Cleantech Economy: Analysis and Strategy Options.


New Report Details Patterns and Gaps in Californians’ Computer Use and Internet Access

Posted on July 1st, 2008 — in Economy and Business :: Technology

A new Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) report details Californian’s internet usage, concluding that up to 55% of Californians go online to read current events or news information, up to 52% go online to shop, and up to 50% look for health information. The percent of Californians who say they use the internet has gone up to 70% from 65% in 2000. 63% of Californians say that they have internet access at home.

However, there is a widening digital divide, according to the report. Fewer than half of Latinos report that they have a computer at home (although there are other data that suggest that many Latinos achieve online access in other ways, including via cell phone). Residents in the Los Angeles region and the Central Valley (62%) are significantly less likely (55%) to have internet access at home than Bay Area residents (71%). The biggest disparity, though, may be economic: those with incomes of less than $40,000 are far less likely (40%) to have an internet connection at home than those with incomes of $80,000 or above (90%).